We always have a choice.

From the ground up, we choose how we want something to effect us. We choose if we want to be better and grow or if we want to be bitter and stagnate and possibly die as a result of our uncontrolled emotions and thoughts. We choose to live or slowly cause or own destruction. We choose to live and experience happiness or hold on to anger, frustration, guilt, sadness, or worry which can lead to overwhelming stress and possibly cause a heart attack, stroke, or a “rare” health condition. Your mind reacts and so does your body.

Is anyone or anything worth that pain and worth your life and right to live?

Timika

Missing? No. Just unrealized potential

“The greatest story every (any)one can tell is the story of their life. Just don’t let the climax of your story be unrealized dreams.”
― Unarine Ramaru

My biggest fear is that at 80 years of age, when I look back on my life, I will regret that I did not follow my passion and this nagging desire in my heart to live my best life.   I have seen so many talented individuals (i.e. able to draw anything and everything with so much precision and detail), and wonder why they were not furthering their education and developing their talent.

It is the realization that one can die (and many have) without fully expressing and sharing his or her God-given talents, skills, abilities, and experiences.

No matter what you have been told or the negative thoughts you have allowed to consume you, you can live your dreams. We need to stop asking why I do not have this or that (thin body, high IQ, ability to type, celebrity friends, and others) to make my dreams come true. We need to, in other words, stop making excuses and start living. Baby steps can lead to more confidence and bigger steps to reach your goals.

I have found that once I decide to do something, doors start opening. Solutions to perceived problems come.  Opportunities are available.   We must believe that we can do whatever it is that has been put on our heart to do…that thing that you keep going back to…that you keep thinking about.  You are thinking about it for a reason (getting chills as I write this).

We must be decisive.

We are all here for a reason.

What have you got to lose? Life is for the living and not to stand in the corner or side lines and watch everyone else live his or her life.

This quote is a friendly reminder for me and is on my vision board.

“I can tell you that what you’re looking for is already inside you.” Anne Lamott

I ask again …..What have we got to lose?

Look at you.

Timika

Hyperbole: Guilty!

Hyperbole

It is interesting that hyperbole is the daily word for today. I have been questioning the worth of hyperboles. Are they necessary? If so, then why?

This past Thursday, I was just sharing with a student how sleep deprived I felt that I was. I admitted that the last time I had some good sleep was before my son was born. As I was sharing that I, too, suffered from a lack of sleep, I questioned why am I agreeing with the need to just sleep my life away? Why am I using the phrase “I could sleep for a long time” when it is not true? Even when I worked nights, years ago, as a staff nurse at a local hospital, I could only sleep for 1-2 hours when I got home. Yes, I was tired, but I did not want to go to sleep during the day. That’s what nights were for. As you probably figured out, I did not work nights for long. There is a time for everything, and my body works well with its “master clock.”

If given the chance today, would I want to sleep my life away? The answer was and still is no, of course. I have so many things I still want to do, and I keep adding activities/events to my bucket list. Honestly, I have been trying to be more mindful of my thoughts and what I say. If I do not mean something, then why say it? It is a waste of energy and a waste of words, yet, I am sure I have used the phrase many times before, especially between the years of 2011-now.

Why do we feel the need to add excessive value to how we feel? With my statement of being tired, acknowledging that I was tired is one thing and to exaggerate is another. Let’s take another hyperbole. “I am so hungry, I can eat a horse.” Can I really? So, why exaggerate? Am I asking for the other person’s permission to go to sleep or to eat? What is my intention for using a hyperbole? To illicit compassion? Money? Food? love? Is it necessary to have others to empathize with me to take me seriously, or did I need the student to feel like she is not alone?

Sometimes when we are going through an ordeal, we think that we are the only one going through something. I usually tell my students they are not alone and can usually share a life changing story without getting to personal. I have to remember that even being quiet and just listening may be what the other person needs at that time especially instead of saying something I know is not true. Does the other person need to know how hungry I am or how sleepy I am? Not necessarily. Constantly feeling the need that one should quantify or quality statements for others to relate does not sound like a healthy habit. I need to change my ways.

I have been aware of another phrase for a very long time and this phrase is “say what you mean and mean what you say.” So, as we constantly evolve, we find out that some of the things we do, the words we say may conflict with something else we believe it or want to believe in. I need to be more true to the phrase “say what you mean and mean what you say” and stop saying things that are not true.

The more one says something, the more one tends to believe it. There is a known link between our beliefs and our actions (self-fulfilling prophecy). Again, as in the example above, I do not need to believe I am so tired. If anything, I need to believe that I am energetic and high on life.

I am guilty of using some hyperboles, and I confess. I need to stop using hyperboles, and just say what I mean, and mean what I say.
Timika
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